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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)
as a law student at harvard. video at a press conference where obama says nothing news worthy. that was explosive tape, not at all. last month it was the drudge report, which means the romney c campaign, it was them again dousing themselves in gasoline and pulling the fire alarm as what was hyped as outrageous video of president obama saying he believes in redistribution. specifically it was that he believes essentially in the progressive tax code that we have had in this country for a time period that's more easily measured in centuries than in individual years. again, not exactly a bomb shell. now they are dousing themselves in gasoline and hitting the fire alarm all over again over a video of president obama speaking as a candidate in 2007. in this video, which the right is very excited about tonight but which has been available online since 2007, mr. obama, then a candidate, acknowledges the presence in the room of his former pastor from chicago, reverend jeremiah wright. steve smith was part of the strategic team in 2008 when they decided that they would not attack barack
changing the law in order to do that? but what's the next best thing? maybe you can't win legally, but maybe you can get the word out. if you can be confusing enough about it, maybe you can forget the law. by virtue of intimidation or at least confusion. here's how it works in the great state of mississippi. in the great state of mississippi this past november, a referendum passed saying people couldn't vote without documentation. that many thousands of mississippi residents do not have. yesterday the department of justice told mississippi that given the special scrutiny that state earned under the voting rights act for many years of suppressing the black vote, given that special scrutiny, the justice department said no to this new proposed law in mississippi. or at least they said not yet. this law is at least not going election in mississippi. you're not going to have to show i.d. to vote in mississippi. the worry here was that because thousands of mississippi legal voters don't have the i.d. that would have been necessary under the new law, this new law would have kept dispropo
by melanie eversley later. you probably heard what happened in pennsylvania regarding their voter i.d. law and we will talk to her about that. we also want to take time to let you know that on our other channels on the weekend, book- tv and american history tv, we look at cities across the united states. our focus this time around is augusta, maine. not only do you get a sense of meeting the people and learning about individual cities and what makes them interesting, here is a little bit of a preview from tonight's program. [video clip] >> this is the first parish church in brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of a uncle tom's cabin. in many ways, the story began here. it is here in pew #23 that harriet beecher stowe, by her account, saw the vision of uncle tom being whipped to to death. he is the title character, the hero of her 1852 novel," uncle tom's cabin." the story is that there is -- there was a slave, a good slave, sold by his first kind owner, mr. shelby, and he sold him to pay debts on his plantation through a series of misadventures, you might say, he ends up in the
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: a pennsylvania judge blocked a new law that would have required voters to show photo i.d. at the polls next month. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, ray suarez examines how the debate over voting rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close wi
of the supreme court, certainly intellect, experience, obs vance of the rule of law and precedent. but the supreme court is the final word of what is the law of the land and so therefore i don't want to see more who say that discrimination against women and discrimination based on gender is not protected against under the constitution. when i go by the supreme court on my way to work every day over the mantle it says equal justice under law. it does not say equal justice for some people in america and not for others. and as it relates to row v. wade, i support that. i support a woman's right to choose. my opponent i don't know which view he has. last year he was prolife, now he's pro-choice. >> senator business and industry complain that the 2010 fair act will be expensive and cut into profits and slow the economic recovery. how do you respond to critics who argue that the economic burden of implementing this policy will wind up costing even more american jobs? >> first of all, the reality is what did he have before the law, double premium increases, unsustainable for a family who
for their first debate tomorrow night in denver. and new questions about whether the president's health care law could soon be back before the u.s. supreme court. judge andrew napolitano weighs in. >>> and jaw-dropping pictures you won't want to miss. wait until you see what cameras caught when discovery tv intentionally crashed a 727 jet liner in an investigation, where's the safest place for you to sit when you fly? we're going to show you, all "happening now." gregg: hello, everybody, i'm gregg jarrett in for jon scott. jenna: hi, everybody, i'm jenna lee. brand new polling out today giving us a snapshot of how the race for the white house is shaping up on the 'of the first -- on the eve of the first presidential debate. the latest quinnipiac poll showing the president leading among likely voters, and that matters. [laughter] take a look at this poll, this same poll shows a much wider gap among women voters. the president holding a commanding lead, 56-38% among likely women voters nationwide. so why is governor romney trailing among women, and can he actually close the gap that's so important
't have to. >>guest: the law says you must give two months notice. that would be the friday before election day. the administration doesn't want the lay off notices so earlier this year, this summer, they said the defense contractors, lockheed market, you don't need to send the notices and look heed said i am not seeing a lost specifics as far as preventing us from going forward with not doing it so on friday the administration offered to pick up the liability because this is the law as well as the costs of limiting the guys go if the layoffs happen. this is a lost deal making, a lot of politics in this situation because the defense contractors big in virginia which is a battle ground state. >>neil: can they do that? is that legal? >>guest: well, republicans say no, republicans are saying the white house is playing politics with this. the g.o.p. is going to go on the offense on the sequester. they note that the house republicans have passed a plan that would hold off the cuts and would replace them with other cuts. the administration has not adopted a specific plan. there has been
. there were people in legal law firm conference rom, they could get an internet connection. people in starbucks where they could get an internet connection. people working at the kitchen tables around town. and all of a sudden, right around april 1st. bestart moving to the headquarter. this is literally six week aways from the announcement. and this just this big space. bigger than the room. far bigger than the room. three or four times of the size of the room. it was a whole floor of the high-rise building in chicago, and it was just kind of remarkable. we didn't have everybody in. we were slowly bringing people in. literally we were still getting the servers up. we had telephones ringing and people try to answer phone calls. we had e-mail coming in to our e-mail address. we didn't have a system to receive e nail a real way that you would want. we had many coming many. we didn't have budgets. and we had, you know, we had constituency leaders calling our political department because they wanted to have time with the candidate, we had our fundraisers, who had to raise money with the
be a violation of the law. >> joined by our pentagon correspondent, barbara starr. you've been digging into this for new information. you say as early as april, the united states sent special forces into benghazi for a specific reason. >> they did, indeed, carol. what we've learned is that a very small team of special forces commandos were sent to that benghazi compound. this was back in april. if you think back a u.n. -- united nations convoy in the region had been attacked. growing security concerns at that time back in april, about what was going on in that region in eastern libya. so, the u.s. sent a team of about four special forces, commandos to the benghazi compound. they did a security assessment. what could be done to improve security at the facility. and they recommended apparently, we are told, a couple of things that seem fairly minor in retrospect. sand bagging some positions so libyan forces who were there, contractors, essentially, could help fight back if the place came under attack and also were training for some of that private security force that was hired for the co
solid government institutions and a judicial branch that treats all venezuelans equally under the law. he was elected to run against chavez after the venezuelan opposition forged an alliance in january. the 40-year-old candidate says he has visited more than 300 venezuelan towns during his campaign. he stepped on to the national scene during a 2002 riot at the cuban embassy in caracas. the chavez government accused him of insighting the riot and sentenced him to jail for four mis. the courts ended up acquitting him. >> you got this young 40-year-old, you know, he's healthy and strong, fit guy and hugo chavez who has been in power for a while. how do they weigh these two? is it a generational thing? how do they split this? >> it's a generational thing. chavez has been suffering from cancer. also just to give you and idea how uneven the playing field is in venezuela, just for the sake of a hypothetical scenario, imagine president obama has a national tv network paid for with public funds that he can use whenever he pleases to campaign. that's exactly what chavez has in venezuela. he has
. >> this isn't about terrorism. these are regular law enforcement investigations, and this is, this is, investigating people's communications. these are, who they talked to. who they e-mailed. who they engage in online conversations with, their friends, family, colleagues and loved once. >> reporter: here are some facts gathered by the aclu from justice department document. between 2009 and 2011 the number of orders for surveillance went up 60%. e-mails and network data, while smaller in number, increased by 361%. this type of information used to be gathered from devices attached right to the telephone but now, it can easily be retrieved by the phone company internally. aclu says it is done without a judge considering merits of the case. but the department of justice fired back saying in a statement, in every instance cited here the federal judge authorized law enforcement activity as criminals increasingly use new and sophisticated technologies use of orders used by a judge and strictly authorized by congress is essential for law enforcement to carry out its duty and to protect the pu
state courts could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo i.d.s for voters? >> the first observation is in terms of that case in maryland, that was one misguided example where it never should have happened, the race wasn't that close, so it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with time in prison. in terms of your concern about voter i.d., and having to show i.d., i live in virginia i just got my voter card. they allow anything like a utility bill or anything like that. it's a lot easier to go vote in america than get on an airplane. so if you're worried about fraud, i think these are reasonable requirements. >> i guess in terms of polling, to the extent that our firms can, we try to poll off a registered voter list so they are registered voters who presumably have -- and in elections we try to sample people who not only register but have voted in past elections. >> but this year the requirements for voting are not going to be just that you register, they're going to be that you have a voter i.d. how do you account for that? >> we ask the
lawsuits pending that could negate some of the new laws that are intended to require photo ids for voters? >> first observation is, in terms of the case in maryland, that was one misguided example. never should have happened. the race was not that close. it was a huge mistake by that individual and he paid for it with a time in prison. in terms of your concerns about voter i.d., and having to show id, i live in virginia and just got my voter card. they allow any kind of thing, a utility bill, or anything like that. it is a lot easier to vote then to get on an airplane. if you are worried about fraud, i think that these are reasonable requirements. >> in terms of polling, to the extent that both firms can, we try to pull a registered voter list. registered voters who have presumably -- i mean, we try to sample who have not only registered -- people who have not only registered but voted in the last election. >> in a lot of states, they have to have a photo id. how do you account for that? >> our callers asked you to show them your folder id -- your photo i.d. >> not a lot that you can do.
by a republican legislature. the law wasself years ago where for one week registration is still open so you can register at the cuyahoga or franklin county or richland county board of elections. you can register to vote and vote in your name trip to the board of elections. >> i like that. >> it really makes sense. we're urging people to come in this week. people particularly who are least likely to be registered an that's people on college campuses coming back to school, more low income people, and people that might have moved for business reasons, whatever, and need to update their registrations. >> okay. here is the battle going on in the air. you were talking the ground game. the obama campaign is running this ad in ohio to attract voters in coal country. let's take a look at this one. >> seen these new ads where mitt romney says he's a friend of coal country? this is the guy who wants to keep tax breaks for companies that ship american jobs overseas. the same guy who had a swiss bank account and millions in tax havens like bermuda and the caymans. and on coal, well, here is what he said as
the warren act that just took place where there are blatant violations of the law, i wouldn't put anything past this administration. >> you know, these are sitting members of congress. >> yeah. >> alan west won, of course. we know his party. he's very conservative nap said, john mccain. are you surprised by his comments? >> i'm very surprised by his comment. all of those comments, they're not just deeply irresponsible, but without a shred of evidence they are casting doubt about a very important number in our economy. now, if you understand the way the bureau of labor statistics collects data, and i used to work for the department of labor, and i used to work for the executive office of the white house. the firewalls are impenetrable and this is an institution that's been delivering day reports with as much integrity as you can imagine for decade upon decade. never any suggestion of political bias that's had anything close to substantiation. so if you think -- i'm a little bit -- this has gotten under my skin, alex. if you think that there's something going on there, and you don't have a s
a good supreme court justice. after all he's picked a couple and taught constitutional law. he said over and over again for him this is all about what's in a judge's heart. when he nominated sonia sotomayor to the supreme court, president obama laid out his criteria for justices. chief among them empathy. >> it is experience that give a person common sense and touch and compassion and understanding of how the world works and how ordinary people live. and that is why it is a necessary ingredient in the kind of justice we need on the supreme court. >> reporter: it's a trait president obama probably wishes more justices shared when they decided citizens united, the case that largely removed independent corporate spending limits on federal political campaigns. he called out the high court during his 2010 state of the union address. >> with all due deference to separation of powers, last week the supreme court reversed a century of law that i believe will open the flood gates for special interests. >> reporter: four months later the president made sure to highlight similar themes when he nomi
, no new laws to limit unions rights if the constitutional amendment is approved and prevent michigan from ever becoming a right to work state and number three it could give unions the ability to mount endless, i mean, endless challenges to local governments. democrats and former lt. governor went head to head with the unions in part he did, perhaps also went head to head as well, but he did save the new york city transit system in the '80s and joins us now on the expertise of running a big state. welcome to the program. >> good to be back. >> if you were trying it run and upper echelons of government in michigan, would you want this constitutional amendment, given the unions this kind of power? >> i'm not an expert at this, but to the extent i read about it, no, i would not. i to not believe in constitutional or in some cases statutory restraints on the ability of the political process to produce a result. we've had serious problems and fiscal problems in most states. i think-- >> you don't want to see governments, state governments go heads to head with the unions. you want more after co
it for that purpose. doing this is a way of achieving kind of, sticking to the current law baseline paths of revenue and spending. not necessarily in the exact timing or form that the current law baseline looks right now but sticking with the essential elements. so those of you who know me know that i obsessed over the current law baseline. i'm quite fond of it and in the past i said what we need to do is follow strict pay as you go. i'm tired of this exempting this, ignoring that. let's stick to strict pay as you go. the next time we kick the can down the road we have to commit to paygo and no exceptions. i will modify that today. instead of paygo it is rego. recycle as you go. use every bit of essential elements but keep moving forward. set targets thaw achieve that congress will by x date, use y percent of the cans that we've kicked down the road. in terms of achieving the same amount of deficit reduction over the 10-year window. just use the budge -- budget committees and budge budget process to enforce this. to come up with reforms that achieve certain spending or revenue targets. the tpc's ana
studies election law, it is great to be in a state where you see presidential candidates campaigning. because of our electoral college system, most of the country nowadays, it is a small number of states that get virtually all of the attention. we are either the beneficiaries are the victims, depending on your perspective. you cannot turn on the television in ohio without seeing a campaign advertisement, including many presidential advertisements, without being hit by a motorcade. in your station, channel 10, at 5:30 in the morning there is a six minute commercial break and in those minutes six different commercial ads ran. at what point is there a law of diminishing returns? guest: if your campaign has the money, you cannot go quiet. i think he would be at a disadvantage, if they go dark. more importantly, to answer the question, the vote in ohio is today, this week. these candidates are doing everything that they can, restructuring to some degree. mitt romney and the president talking directly to the camera, making their appeal. i think that dan is right. this is one of five states
the antitrust laws. that was ideological and they did not like william jennings bryan because they thought he was a socialist. they said if you want our thinking and the white house, we want somebody who sees things our way. the great line that came after that was that theodore roosevelt could not stay bought. theodore roosevelt said we should have public funding out of the treasury. if you look back at the supreme court in the citizens united case, you see a court that has two dare -- very different views over what is happening. we have your view which is a perfectly respectable view of the aspirations that there will these -- will be these independent groups speaking and saying what they want to say. it will be fully disclosed and it will not be corrupting independents. then you have the minority that caught the reality of most of the spending this year. their view was that this would be funded by giant corporations with specific legislative interests. that is why they will give so much money. it turns out it is not fully disclosed. it turns out it is not for individual candidates. it perha
in federal court if bin laden was captured. the book said he felt dew processs and the rule of law would be the best weapon against al-qaida. >> gretchen: the world's largest generic drug maker pulling the drug antidepressant from a storage shelve. wellbuttrin. it doesn't work like it is supposed to. they found wharf it is. it released. okay it releases faster than the original drug in 2008. federal officials said the two were. now you know why i am not a pharmacist. >> brian: plus you hate the cotton balls. >> gretchen: i do. >> brian: how could a christian bible house not religious. they asked for a exemption of the controversial birth. tyndale house said the ma date violates the beliefs. he said 95 percent of the profits go to non. >> steve: it is the laziest invention ever. the hop and suitcase that follows you around. using the blue tooth signal on your cell phone. fine as long as someone doesn't use yourr cell phone. if it is lost, the bag locks itself and alert the owner's phone. the 28 year old who came up with the idea said it is not ready for the market. >> gretchen: looks like
of six best legislators. every single law was passed in a bipartisan manner, with a republican governor, republican senate, democratic house. i have always worked together in a bipartisan manner. that is the value of my record. when you are looking at these two candidates, this is a person who has never been elected to anything. mr. cruz. i have a record you can look at. bipartisan record that you can look at. >> this election is a clear choice between the obama democrats, more spending, more debt, more government control, and going back to our founding freedoms. >> we need to get out of here. because we are out of time. thank you as always. >> thank you and thank you to both candidates. we want to leave you with a final note -- early voting begins oct. 22. just three weeks from now. the election is november 6. that does it for the belo debate from victory park in dallas. for all of us, have a good night, everybody. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> see the debate tomorrow night, and watch and engage. comi
where they still have not rebuilt 20 months later there is a federal law when you get reconstruction money from the federal government called the stanford act. basically it says, when you get federal money you have got to give a 10 percent match. the local government has to come up with 10 percent. here's the facts. when 9-11 happened in new york city, they waived the stafford act, said this is too serious a problem, we can't expect new york city to rebuild on test own. forget the dollar you have to put in. that's the right thing to do. what's happening in new orleans? where is your dollar? where is your stafford act money? makes no sense. tells me the bullet hasn't been taken out. tells me somehow the people down in new orleans they don't care about as much. >> as we mentioned earlier the daily caller obtained the video. fox news contributor and chief of the web site carlson was on "hannity" last night to discuss what you saw. >> the first thing will jump off the screen at you this is not the barack obama you have watched for the last 10 years he is whipping up race, trahatred fear.
health care law last june. so how might mitt romney change the high court if he becomes president of the united states? he's already giving all of us some major clues. let's bring in cnn's crime and justice correspondent joe johns who's taking a closer look. what are you seeing? >> the supreme court doesn't get talked about that much on the campaign trail. but choosing a justice is one of the most important things a president does. it's how on administration puts its mark on some of the nation east toughest, most divisive issues. and we have a look at how mitt romney might handle it if he's president. whenever mitt romney fielded questions during the primaries about his picks for the supreme court, he was armed with a stock republican answer. >> what i would look to do would be to appoint people to the supreme court that will follow strictly the constitution as opposed to to legislating from the bench. >> reporter: but he wouldn't choose a favorite. >> would you pick one, please? >> yes, roberts, thomas, alito and scalia. >> reporter: all that changed in june when roberts cast the
and the president's health care reform law. while there wasn't a knockout punch by either side, some feel the president may have been too relaxed. >> this time, he seemed just a little detached at times. didn't want to be there. >> reporter: most agree romney led the debate. and after lagging in many polls, this first match-up could give him the boost he needed. >> knowing he's behind and he needs to win. and he came in and fought that fight stylistically. i think he put the president on defense a number of times. >> reporter: now, the candidates aren't wasting any time. they're getting back on the campaign trail today. and the big next week when the vice presidential candidates go one-on-one in kentucky. live in denver, brandi hitt. back to you. >> big issues and controversies in the headlines last few weeks, never mentioned last night. >> reporter: definitely. that's what's interesting, rob and paula. you talk to the analysts. and a lot of people were waiting for president obama to bring up mitt romney's past at bain capital. and that 47% comment he made over the last couple of weeks. a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 89 (some duplicates have been removed)